Netbooks: Students, Faculty, Staff, ExamSoft

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken
the plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're
going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that
keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil

Netbooks

Phil,

No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:

1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9" screen) - Fine little machine. Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web. The biggest downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a little bit too small for sustained work.
2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and very nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs Windows XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive Computing ( http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of discussing 10" screens vs. 8.9" screens and compares the Wind favorably to the Acer Aspire One. The only issue with this machine so far was that the 3-cell battery failed after about one month. We RMA'd the machine and had no trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked just fine. It looks like it's now about $320 at Newegg: http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB ports, so I would assume that a 3G USB modem could be fitted - that might keep your options open in the case that this is not an appropriate device.

Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop machine. It's built on the same Intel Atom processor as current generation of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket that will theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor already uses those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a monitor. We are considering deploying these in the computer lab. They are also $320 ( http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with 802.11n as well as regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the keyboard and mouse which are pretty low quality and rather small. I would probably buy or re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.

Best,

Ben

On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu> wrote:

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken the plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil

--
Submit help requests at: http://www.law.emory.edu/help/
Benjamin J. Chapman, J.D., Asst Dean, Information Technology
Emory University School of Law - Gtalk,Skype: benjamin.chapman
Email: ben.chapman@emory.edu Ofc: 404-727-6948 Cell: 404-313-9544

________________________________
This e-mail message (including any attachments) is for the sole use of
the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged
information. If the reader of this message is not the intended
recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution
or copying of this message (including any attachments) is strictly
prohibited.

If you have received this message in error, please contact
the sender by reply e-mail message and destroy all copies of the
original message (including attachments).

Ben Chapman
Assistant Dean, Information Technology
Emory University School of Law

Netbooks

I looked at a number of machines and read every review I could get my hands
on. I chose the MSI Wind U100. It's been great except I had the same
problem mentioned by Ben - the battery failed. I RMA'd the machine and got
a very quick turnaround. Other than that - I've had no problems. Memory
upgrades are also cheap - I found one from Crucial for $14.

Syd Beckman
Dean and Professor of Law
Lincoln Memorial University School of Law

On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 9:16 AM, Chapman, Ben <ben.chapman@emory.edu> wrote:

> Phil,
>
> No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:
>
>
> 1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9" screen) - Fine little machine.
> Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web. The biggest
> downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a little bit too small
> for sustained work.
> 2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and very
> nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs Windows
> XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive Computing (
> http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of discussing
> 10" screens vs. 8.9" screens and compares the Wind favorably to the Acer
> Aspire One. The only issue with this machine so far was that the 3-cell
> battery failed after about one month. We RMA'd the machine and had no
> trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked just fine. It
> looks like it's now about $320 at Newegg: http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 .
> It has three USB ports, so I would assume that a 3G USB modem could be
> fitted – that might keep your options open in the case that this is not an
> appropriate device.
>
>
> Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop
> machine. It's built on the same Intel Atom processor as current generation
> of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket that will
> theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor already uses
> those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a monitor. We are
> considering deploying these in the computer lab. They are also $320 (
> http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with 802.11n as well as
> regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the keyboard and mouse
> which are pretty low quality and rather small. I would probably buy or
> re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.
>
> Best,
>
> Ben
>
>
> On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu>
> wrote:
>
> Folks,
>
> Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken the
> plunge.
>
> Any cautionary tales?
>
> I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're going
> to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that keyboards
> are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Phil
>
>
>
> --
> Submit help requests at: http://www.law.emory.edu/help/
> Benjamin J. Chapman, J.D., Asst Dean, Information Technology
> Emory University School of Law - Gtalk,Skype: benjamin.chapman
> Email: ben.chapman@emory.edu Ofc: 404-727-6948 Cell: 404-313-9544
>
> ------------------------------
> This e-mail message (including any attachments) is for the sole use of
> the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged
> information. If the reader of this message is not the intended
> recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution
> or copying of this message (including any attachments) is strictly
> prohibited.
>
> If you have received this message in error, please contact
> the sender by reply e-mail message and destroy all copies of the
> original message (including attachments).
>
> _______________________________________________
> You are currently subscribed to teknoids as: sydbeckman@gmail.com.
> To unsubscribe send a blank email to teknoids-leave@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
> --
> See the web interface at
> http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/teknoids to get your list
> password, unsubscribe, and view your list settings.
>

RE: Netbooks

I am currently running a Dell Mini 9, 1GB ram, 16 GB SSD. Sub $500. Runs
XP and MS Office. Besides being a tad slow to startup/launch (Atom), it
has been an effective device. Keyboard is a little cramped with some
odd key placement. Fingers crossed for the Dell Mini 10...

Also, I have been reviewing an HP 2133 eval unit. Most folks like the
exterior. Touchpad/button layout painful to use. Wider keyboard nice.
The screen is so glossy it is hard to use. Price not that attractive.

Anyone played with the Sony VAIO P series?

-Mike

==============================

Michael Harvey

Director of Technology

Law Technology Services

The University of Texas School of Law

512-232-2736 wk | mharvey@law.utexas.edu

Website: http://www.utexas.edu/law/depts/lts/

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Sydney
Beckman
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 9:56 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Netbooks

I looked at a number of machines and read every review I could get my
hands on. I chose the MSI Wind U100. It's been great except I had the
same problem mentioned by Ben - the battery failed. I RMA'd the machine
and got a very quick turnaround. Other than that - I've had no
problems. Memory upgrades are also cheap - I found one from Crucial for
$14.

Syd Beckman

Dean and Professor of Law

Lincoln Memorial University School of Law

On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 9:16 AM, Chapman, Ben <ben.chapman@emory.edu>
wrote:

Phil,

No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:

1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9" screen) - Fine little
machine. Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web.
The biggest downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a
little bit too small for sustained work.
2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and
very nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs
Windows XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive
Computing ( http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of
discussing 10" screens vs. 8.9" screens and compares the Wind favorably
to the Acer Aspire One. The only issue with this machine so far was that
the 3-cell battery failed after about one month. We RMA'd the machine
and had no trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked
just fine. It looks like it's now about $320 at Newegg:
http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB ports, so I would assume
that a 3G USB modem could be fitted - that might keep your options open
in the case that this is not an appropriate device.

Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop
machine. It's built on the same Intel Atom processor as current
generation of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket
that will theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor
already uses those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a
monitor. We are considering deploying these in the computer lab. They
are also $320 ( http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with
802.11n as well as regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the
keyboard and mouse which are pretty low quality and rather small. I
would probably buy or re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.

Best,

Ben

On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu>
wrote:

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken
the plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're
going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that
keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil

RE: Netbooks

I just bought a Lenovo S10 Ideapad.

I went with the 80 GIG hd, 512 MB Ram $299

I installed a 2 GB memory module for $25 on newegg.com .

Works great for

SSH and Web work

as well as Acrobat, Word, Excel, and watching the occasion Youtube
video.

I was also able to run some sound software (Traktor, Serato), on the
machine without a problem or slowdown.

I noticed that running HD over the web via Flash is a little much for
the device.

I also love the size and weight.

The 10" screen is nice.

The keyboard takes a little getting used to. Especially the right shift
key.

If you are not looking to do any heavy multi-track sound or video
editing the S10 is a great portable computer. (under 3 pounds)

One issue I noticed is with the power settings. The default power
setting for running on batteries is to cut the CPU performance in half.

I couldn't work with the half CPU performance. The setting was easily
changed.

A student brought it in to our offices one day and I was sold.

----

Nicholas Urrea

Information Technology

UC Hastings College of the Law

urrean@uchastings.edu

x4718

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Michael
Harvey
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 8:41 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: RE: [teknoids] Netbooks

I am currently running a Dell Mini 9, 1GB ram, 16 GB SSD. Sub $500. Runs
XP and MS Office. Besides being a tad slow to startup/launch (Atom), it
has been an effective device. Keyboard is a little cramped with some
odd key placement. Fingers crossed for the Dell Mini 10...

Also, I have been reviewing an HP 2133 eval unit. Most folks like the
exterior. Touchpad/button layout painful to use. Wider keyboard nice.
The screen is so glossy it is hard to use. Price not that attractive.

Anyone played with the Sony VAIO P series?

-Mike

==============================

Michael Harvey

Director of Technology

Law Technology Services

The University of Texas School of Law

512-232-2736 wk | mharvey@law.utexas.edu

Website: http://www.utexas.edu/law/depts/lts/

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Sydney
Beckman
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 9:56 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Netbooks

I looked at a number of machines and read every review I could get my
hands on. I chose the MSI Wind U100. It's been great except I had the
same problem mentioned by Ben - the battery failed. I RMA'd the machine
and got a very quick turnaround. Other than that - I've had no
problems. Memory upgrades are also cheap - I found one from Crucial for
$14.

Syd Beckman

Dean and Professor of Law

Lincoln Memorial University School of Law

On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 9:16 AM, Chapman, Ben <ben.chapman@emory.edu>
wrote:

Phil,

No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:

1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9" screen) - Fine little
machine. Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web.
The biggest downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a
little bit too small for sustained work.
2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and
very nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs
Windows XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive
Computing ( http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of
discussing 10" screens vs. 8.9" screens and compares the Wind favorably
to the Acer Aspire One. The only issue with this machine so far was that
the 3-cell battery failed after about one month. We RMA'd the machine
and had no trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked
just fine. It looks like it's now about $320 at Newegg:
http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB ports, so I would assume
that a 3G USB modem could be fitted - that might keep your options open
in the case that this is not an appropriate device.

Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop
machine. It's built on the same Intel Atom processor as current
generation of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket
that will theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor
already uses those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a
monitor. We are considering deploying these in the computer lab. They
are also $320 ( http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with
802.11n as well as regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the
keyboard and mouse which are pretty low quality and rather small. I
would probably buy or re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.

Best,

Ben

On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu>
wrote:

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken
the plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're
going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that
keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil

Netbooks

I know this thread-response is a bit dated, but what can I say, I'm
behind on email...

I've been experimenting with the ASUS eee and other staff here have been
working with the Lenovo S10 and Acer netbooks.

I boosted the ASUS memory to 2 GB, hard drive to 250GB and installed
Windows 7. Runs great. The battery life on this is very good. With
the six cell battery I can drag it around to meetings all day without
having to plug it in (and I've read that the new model lasts even
longer). I've more or less stopped using this netbook as a daily laptop
because of the low screen resolution (1024x600). Having 200 more pixels
in the vertical dimension makes working with documents go much better
for me. My personal school laptop has1400x1050 which is great for
reading and marking-up large documents.

The ASUS touch pad buttons are a little stiff on the model I have been
using (the 904HA).

I've also been experimenting with a Kindle, which has cellular
connectivity for file download, but with an even smaller screen. For
light reading it has been very nice and I think a better experience (for
reading documents) than the Apple or Android devices I've tried,
especially in bright light.

Steve Winckelman
University of Minnesota

Urrea, Nick wrote:
>
> I just bought a Lenovo S10 Ideapad.
>
> I went with the 80 GIG hd, 512 MB Ram $299
>
> I installed a 2 GB memory module for $25 on newegg.com .
>
>
>
> Works great for
>
> SSH and Web work
>
> as well as Acrobat, Word, Excel, and watching the occasion Youtube video.
>
> I was also able to run some sound software (Traktor, Serato), on the
> machine without a problem or slowdown.
>
> I noticed that running HD over the web via Flash is a little much for
> the device.
>
> I also love the size and weight.
>
> The 10" screen is nice.
>
> The keyboard takes a little getting used to. Especially the right
> shift key.
>
> If you are not looking to do any heavy multi-track sound or video
> editing the S10 is a great portable computer. (under 3 pounds)
>
> One issue I noticed is with the power settings. The default power
> setting for running on batteries is to cut the CPU performance in half.
>
> I couldn't work with the half CPU performance. The setting was easily
> changed.
>
>
>
> A student brought it in to our offices one day and I was sold.
>
>
>
> ----
>
> Nicholas Urrea
>
> Information Technology
>
> UC Hastings College of the Law
>
> urrean@uchastings.edu
>
> x4718
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
> [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of
> *Michael Harvey
> *Sent:* Monday, February 23, 2009 8:41 AM
> *To:* Teknoids
> *Subject:* RE: [teknoids] Netbooks
>
>
>
> I am currently running a Dell Mini 9, 1GB ram, 16 GB SSD. Sub $500.
> Runs XP and MS Office. Besides being a tad slow to startup/launch
> (Atom), it has been an effective device. Keyboard is a little cramped
> with some odd key placement. Fingers crossed for the Dell Mini 10...
>
>
>
> Also, I have been reviewing an HP 2133 eval unit. Most folks like the
> exterior. Touchpad/button layout painful to use. Wider keyboard nice.
> The screen is so glossy it is hard to use. Price not that attractive.
>
>
>
> Anyone played with the Sony VAIO P series?
>
>
>
> -Mike
>
>
>
> ==============================
>
> Michael Harvey
>
> Director of Technology
>
> Law Technology Services
>
>
>
> The University of Texas School of Law
>
> 512-232-2736 wk | mharvey@law.utexas.edu
>
> Website: http://www.utexas.edu/law/depts/lts/
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
> [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *Sydney
> Beckman
> *Sent:* Monday, February 23, 2009 9:56 AM
> *To:* Teknoids
> *Subject:* Re: [teknoids] Netbooks
>
>
>
> I looked at a number of machines and read every review I could get my
> hands on. I chose the MSI Wind U100. It's been great except I had
> the same problem mentioned by Ben - the battery failed. I RMA'd the
> machine and got a very quick turnaround. Other than that - I've had
> no problems. Memory upgrades are also cheap - I found one from
> Crucial for $14.
>
>
>
> Syd Beckman
>
> Dean and Professor of Law
>
> Lincoln Memorial University School of Law
>
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 9:16 AM, Chapman, Ben <ben.chapman@emory.edu
> > wrote:
>
> Phil,
>
> No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:
>
> 1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9" screen) - Fine little
> machine. Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on
> the web. The biggest downside is that both the screen and the
> keyboard are a little bit too small for sustained work.
> 2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and
> very nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard
> drive; runs Windows XP. I bought one on the strength of this
> review in Defensive Computing ( http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The
> review does a nice job of discussing 10" screens vs. 8.9"
> screens and compares the Wind favorably to the Acer Aspire One.
> The only issue with this machine so far was that the 3-cell
> battery failed after about one month. We RMA'd the machine and
> had no trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked
> just fine. It looks like it's now about $320 at Newegg:
> http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB ports, so I would
> assume that a 3G USB modem could be fitted -- that might keep
> your options open in the case that this is not an appropriate
> device.
>
>
> Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use
> desktop machine. It's built on the same Intel Atom processor as
> current generation of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible
> mounting bracket that will theoretically (depending on whether the
> base of your monitor already uses those mounts) allow you to mount it
> to the back of a monitor. We are considering deploying these in the
> computer lab. They are also $320 ( http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4
> ) at NewEgg. They come with 802.11n as
> well as regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the keyboard
> and mouse which are pretty low quality and rather small. I would
> probably buy or re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.
>
> Best,
>
> Ben
>
>
> On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu
> > wrote:
>
> Folks,
>
> Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken
> the plunge.
>
> Any cautionary tales?
>
> I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're
> going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that
> keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Phil
>
>
>

RE: Netbooks

As a follow up to my earlier post I ordered three Dell Mini 9s shortly
after this thread started.

I received the spare battery, ac adapters two days later. The first two
netbooks arrived about thirty days later, the third netbook and the
additional memory are promised within the next week (about 60 days after
order).

These were all on the same order.

Apparently the Dell Minis are popular? I know that they have
discontinued the 9" (mini 9) model so that may be playing into the
delays associated with the third machine.

Just FYI

Phil

Pepperdine Law

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Steve
Winckelman
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 1:42 PM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Netbooks

I know this thread-response is a bit dated, but what can I say, I'm
behind on email...

I've been experimenting with the ASUS eee and other staff here have been
working with the Lenovo S10 and Acer netbooks.

I boosted the ASUS memory to 2 GB, hard drive to 250GB and installed
Windows 7. Runs great. The battery life on this is very good. With
the six cell battery I can drag it around to meetings all day without
having to plug it in (and I've read that the new model lasts even
longer). I've more or less stopped using this netbook as a daily laptop
because of the low screen resolution (1024x600). Having 200 more pixels
in the vertical dimension makes working with documents go much better
for me. My personal school laptop has1400x1050 which is great for
reading and marking-up large documents.

The ASUS touch pad buttons are a little stiff on the model I have been
using (the 904HA).

I've also been experimenting with a Kindle, which has cellular
connectivity for file download, but with an even smaller screen. For
light reading it has been very nice and I think a better experience (for
reading documents) than the Apple or Android devices I've tried,
especially in bright light.

Steve Winckelman
University of Minnesota

Urrea, Nick wrote:

I just bought a Lenovo S10 Ideapad.

I went with the 80 GIG hd, 512 MB Ram $299

I installed a 2 GB memory module for $25 on newegg.com .

Works great for

SSH and Web work

as well as Acrobat, Word, Excel, and watching the occasion Youtube
video.

I was also able to run some sound software (Traktor, Serato), on the
machine without a problem or slowdown.

I noticed that running HD over the web via Flash is a little much for
the device.

I also love the size and weight.

The 10" screen is nice.

The keyboard takes a little getting used to. Especially the right shift
key.

If you are not looking to do any heavy multi-track sound or video
editing the S10 is a great portable computer. (under 3 pounds)

One issue I noticed is with the power settings. The default power
setting for running on batteries is to cut the CPU performance in half.

I couldn't work with the half CPU performance. The setting was easily
changed.

A student brought it in to our offices one day and I was sold.

----

Nicholas Urrea

Information Technology

UC Hastings College of the Law

urrean@uchastings.edu

x4718

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Michael
Harvey
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 8:41 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: RE: [teknoids] Netbooks

I am currently running a Dell Mini 9, 1GB ram, 16 GB SSD. Sub $500. Runs
XP and MS Office. Besides being a tad slow to startup/launch (Atom), it
has been an effective device. Keyboard is a little cramped with some
odd key placement. Fingers crossed for the Dell Mini 10...

Also, I have been reviewing an HP 2133 eval unit. Most folks like the
exterior. Touchpad/button layout painful to use. Wider keyboard nice.
The screen is so glossy it is hard to use. Price not that attractive.

Anyone played with the Sony VAIO P series?

-Mike

==============================

Michael Harvey

Director of Technology

Law Technology Services

The University of Texas School of Law

512-232-2736 wk | mharvey@law.utexas.edu

Website: http://www.utexas.edu/law/depts/lts/

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Sydney
Beckman
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 9:56 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Netbooks

I looked at a number of machines and read every review I could get my
hands on. I chose the MSI Wind U100. It's been great except I had the
same problem mentioned by Ben - the battery failed. I RMA'd the machine
and got a very quick turnaround. Other than that - I've had no
problems. Memory upgrades are also cheap - I found one from Crucial for
$14.

Syd Beckman

Dean and Professor of Law

Lincoln Memorial University School of Law

On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 9:16 AM, Chapman, Ben <ben.chapman@emory.edu>
wrote:

Phil,

No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:

1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9" screen) - Fine little
machine. Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web.
The biggest downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a
little bit too small for sustained work.
2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and
very nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs
Windows XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive
Computing ( http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of
discussing 10" screens vs. 8.9" screens and compares the Wind favorably
to the Acer Aspire One. The only issue with this machine so far was that
the 3-cell battery failed after about one month. We RMA'd the machine
and had no trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked
just fine. It looks like it's now about $320 at Newegg:
http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB ports, so I would assume
that a 3G USB modem could be fitted - that might keep your options open
in the case that this is not an appropriate device.

Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop
machine. It's built on the same Intel Atom processor as current
generation of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket
that will theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor
already uses those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a
monitor. We are considering deploying these in the computer lab. They
are also $320 ( http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with
802.11n as well as regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the
keyboard and mouse which are pretty low quality and rather small. I
would probably buy or re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.

Best,

Ben

On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu>
wrote:

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken
the plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're
going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that
keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil

Phil Bohl
Pepperdine Law

RE: Netbooks

I just purchased a Dell Mini 12, so far it's nice. Only having 1GB ram is
a little of a turn off. (Non-Upgradeable) 1GB of ram was a little light for
Vista Basic, I proceded to install Ubuntu Netbook Remix instead. I liked
it better, but it was still a little slow running Gnome, so I instead
installed Xfce as the GUI, and turned off Gnome. Now it's definitely a nice
laptop. The keyboard is a little odd compared to my full size Dell, but
I'll probably get used to it.

-Mike

From: teknoids-bounes@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Bohl, Phillip
C.
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 4:58 PM
To: Teknoids
Subject: RE: [teknoids] Netbooks

As a follow up to my earlier post I ordered three Dell Mini 9s shortly after
this thread started.

I received the spare battery, ac adapters two days later. The first two
netbooks arrived about thirty days later, the third netbook and the
additional memory are promised within the next week (about 60 days after
order).

These were all on the same order.

Apparently the Dell Minis are popular? I know that they have discontinued
the 9" (mini 9) model so that may be playing into the delays associated with
the third machine.

Just FYI

Phil

Pepperdine Law

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Steve
Winckelman
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 1:42 PM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Netbooks

I know this thread-response is a bit dated, but what can I say, I'm behind
on email...

I've been experimenting with the ASUS eee and other staff here have been
working with the Lenovo S10 and Acer netbooks.

I boosted the ASUS memory to 2 GB, hard drive to 250GB and installed Windows
7. Runs great. The battery life on this is very good. With the six cell
battery I can drag it around to meetings all day without having to plug it
in (and I've read that the new model lasts even longer). I've more or less
stopped using this netbook as a daily laptop because of the low screen
resolution (1024x600). Having 200 more pixels in the vertical dimension
makes working with documents go much better for me. My personal school
laptop has1400x1050 which is great for reading and marking-up large
documents.

The ASUS touch pad buttons are a little stiff on the model I have been using
(the 904HA).

I've also been experimenting with a Kindle, which has cellular connectivity
for file download, but with an even smaller screen. For light reading it
has been very nice and I think a better experience (for reading documents)
than the Apple or Android devices I've tried, especially in bright light.

Steve Winckelman
University of Minnesota

Urrea, Nick wrote:

I just bought a Lenovo S10 Ideapad.

I went with the 80 GIG hd, 512 MB Ram $299

I installed a 2 GB memory module for $25 on newegg.com .

Works great for

SSH and Web work

as well as Acrobat, Word, Excel, and watching the occasion Youtube video.

I was also able to run some sound software (Traktor, Serato), on the machine
without a problem or slowdown.

I noticed that running HD over the web via Flash is a little much for the
device.

I also love the size and weight.

The 10" screen is nice.

The keyboard takes a little getting used to. Especially the right shift key.

If you are not looking to do any heavy multi-track sound or video editing
the S10 is a great portable computer. (under 3 pounds)

One issue I noticed is with the power settings. The default power setting
for running on batteries is to cut the CPU performance in half.

I couldn't work with the half CPU performance. The setting was easily
changed.

A student brought it in to our offices one day and I was sold.

----

Nicholas Urrea

Information Technology

UC Hastings College of the Law

urrean@uchastings.edu

x4718

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Michael Harvey
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 8:41 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: RE: [teknoids] Netbooks

I am currently running a Dell Mini 9, 1GB ram, 16 GB SSD. Sub $500. Runs XP
and MS Office. Besides being a tad slow to startup/launch (Atom), it has
been an effective device. Keyboard is a little cramped with some odd key
placement. Fingers crossed for the Dell Mini 10.

Also, I have been reviewing an HP 2133 eval unit. Most folks like the
exterior. Touchpad/button layout painful to use. Wider keyboard nice. The
screen is so glossy it is hard to use. Price not that attractive.

Anyone played with the Sony VAIO P series?

-Mike

==============================

Michael Harvey

Director of Technology

Law Technology Services

The University of Texas School of Law

512-232-2736 wk | mharvey@law.utexas.edu

Website: http://www.utexas.edu/law/depts/lts/

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Sydney Beckman
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 9:56 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Netbooks

I looked at a number of machines and read every review I could get my hands
on. I chose the MSI Wind U100. It's been great except I had the same
problem mentioned by Ben - the battery failed. I RMA'd the machine and got
a very quick turnaround. Other than that - I've had no problems. Memory
upgrades are also cheap - I found one from Crucial for $14.

Syd Beckman

Dean and Professor of Law

Lincoln Memorial University School of Law

On Mon, Feb 23, 2009 at 9:16 AM, Chapman, Ben <ben.chapman@emory.edu> wrote:

Phil,

No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:

1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9" screen) - Fine little machine.
Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web. The biggest
downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a little bit too small
for sustained work.
2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and very
nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs Windows
XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive Computing (
http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of discussing 10"
screens vs. 8.9" screens and compares the Wind favorably to the Acer Aspire
One. The only issue with this machine so far was that the 3-cell battery
failed after about one month. We RMA'd the machine and had no trouble
getting a replacement. The new battery has worked just fine. It looks like
it's now about $320 at Newegg: http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB
ports, so I would assume that a 3G USB modem could be fitted - that might
keep your options open in the case that this is not an appropriate device.

Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop
machine. It's built on the same Intel Atom processor as current generation
of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket that will
theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor already uses
those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a monitor. We are
considering deploying these in the computer lab. They are also $320 (
http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with 802.11n as well as
regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the keyboard and mouse
which are pretty low quality and rather small. I would probably buy or
re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.

Best,

Ben

On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu> wrote:

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken the
plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I'm planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I'm pretty sure we're going
to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that keyboards
are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil

Netbooks

I was looking for an MSI WIND with the N280 processor and ended up
buying an ACER 4730. This gives me a
T4200 dual core processor at 2GHz, 4 GB of RAM, a 360GB harddrive,
webcam, 1280x800, Bluetooth, 902.11N,
and Gigahertz ethernet. The MSI WIND OSX install disk runs well on
this machine ;^).

Steven

On Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 10:06 PM, Jewell, Michael
<mjewell@law.umaryland.edu> wrote:
> I just purchased a Dell Mini 12,  so far it’s nice.  Only having 1GB ram is
> a little of a turn off. (Non-Upgradeable)  1GB of ram was a little light for
> Vista Basic,  I proceded to install Ubuntu Netbook Remix instead.  I liked
> it better,  but it was still a little slow running Gnome,  so I instead
> installed Xfce as the GUI, and turned off Gnome.  Now it’s definitely a nice
> laptop…  The keyboard is a little odd compared to my full size Dell,  but
> I’ll probably get used to it.
>

Netbooks

Ben

The new U120 has a six cell battery. I recommended it to one of our
faculty who just purchased it and I got the chance to work on it and I
think its pretty nice. I am familiar with the brand because the Law
Library has a U100 as well, so far the battery hasn't failed on that,
but thanks for the heads up.

Phil, both the U100 and U120s are well designed, and unlike a lot of
the machines I have seen reviews on, they don't run very hot.

Gary

Gary Moore, CISSP
Assistant Dean for Information Systems
Hofstra University School of Law
Gary.P.Moore@hofstra.edu
(516) 463-6067

>>> On 2/23/2009 at 9:16 AM, in message
<C5C819E0.1B52B%ben.chapman@emory.edu>, "Chapman, Ben"
<ben.chapman@emory.edu> wrote:
Phil,

No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:

The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9” screen) - Fine little machine.
Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web. The
biggest downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a little
bit too small for sustained work.
The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and very
nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs
Windows XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive
Computing ( http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of
discussing 10” screens vs. 8.9” screens and compares the Wind favorably
to the Acer Aspire One. The only issue with this machine so far was that
the 3-cell battery failed after about one month. We RMA’d the machine
and had no trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked
just fine. It looks like it’s now about $320 at Newegg:
http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB ports, so I would assume
that a 3G USB modem could be fitted – that might keep your options open
in the case that this is not an appropriate device.

Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop
machine. It’s built on the same Intel Atom processor as current
generation of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket
that will theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor
already uses those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a
monitor. We are considering deploying these in the computer lab. They
are also $320 ( http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with
802.11n as well as regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the
keyboard and mouse which are pretty low quality and rather small. I
would probably buy or re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.

Best,

Ben

On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu>
wrote:

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken
the plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I’m planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I’m pretty sure we’re
going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that
keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil

RE: Netbooks

I’m looking at a netbook offering for our student notebook program this year. I have a sample ASUS EEE 901 with a 3rd party Solid State Drive (16GB Mini-PCI-e from RunCore). Killer battery life but the keyboard is annoying.

The Levovo S10e has a *MUCH* nicer keyboard and a 10” screen. I’m looking at less than $500 for 3 years of NBD warranty AND accidental damage coverage. 2GB of RAM and an 80GB hard drive. The HD is a standard 2.5” SATA notebook drive that’s easy to get at for cloning. Also, the Lenovo has an express card 34 slot for a 3G modem; I don’t know of any other netbook with expansion card slots. 6 cell battery as well.

Greg Smith
Manager, Information Technology Office
UMD School of Law

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Gary Moore
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2009 9:29 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Netbooks

Ben

The new U120 has a six cell battery. I recommended it to one of our faculty who just purchased it and I got the chance to work on it and I think its pretty nice. I am familiar with the brand because the Law Library has a U100 as well, so far the battery hasn't failed on that, but thanks for the heads up.

Phil, both the U100 and U120s are well designed, and unlike a lot of the machines I have seen reviews on, they don't run very hot.

Gary

Gary Moore, CISSP
Assistant Dean for Information Systems
Hofstra University School of Law
Gary.P.Moore@hofstra.edu
(516) 463-6067

>>> On 2/23/2009 at 9:16 AM, in message <C5C819E0.1B52B%ben.chapman@emory.edu>, "Chapman, Ben" <ben.chapman@emory.edu> wrote:

Phil,

No cautionary tales but we have tried two so far:

1. The original Asus EEPC (4GB SSD/8.9” screen) - Fine little machine. Runs Linux, etc. and has been covered over and over on the web. The biggest downside is that both the screen and the keyboard are a little bit too small for sustained work.
2. The MSI Wind U100. This machine has a terrific matte screen and very nice keyboard; has an Atom, 1GB Ram, and a 160GB hard drive; runs Windows XP. I bought one on the strength of this review in Defensive Computing ( http://tinyurl.com/a9lcjl ). The review does a nice job of discussing 10” screens vs. 8.9” screens and compares the Wind favorably to the Acer Aspire One. The only issue with this machine so far was that the 3-cell battery failed after about one month. We RMA’d the machine and had no trouble getting a replacement. The new battery has worked just fine. It looks like it’s now about $320 at Newegg: http://tinyurl.com/dyx2w8 . It has three USB ports, so I would assume that a 3G USB modem could be fitted – that might keep your options open in the case that this is not an appropriate device.

Also, we are currently evaluating an Asus EEEBox as a light-use desktop machine. It’s built on the same Intel Atom processor as current generation of netbooks. It comes with a vesa-compatible mounting bracket that will theoretically (depending on whether the base of your monitor already uses those mounts) allow you to mount it to the back of a monitor. We are considering deploying these in the computer lab. They are also $320 ( http://tinyurl.com/4or8s4 ) at NewEgg. They come with 802.11n as well as regular ethernet. The only negative here would be the keyboard and mouse which are pretty low quality and rather small. I would probably buy or re-use existing full-size keyboards and mice.

Best,

Ben

On 2/20/09 12:52 PM, "Bohl, Phillip C." <Phillip.Bohl@pepperdine.edu> wrote:

Folks,

Looking pretty hard at netbooks. I must confess I have not yet taken the plunge.

Any cautionary tales?

I’m planning to pick up a few for evaluation. I’m pretty sure we’re going to get the Dean a 3G unit for on-the-road email (I am told that keyboards are nice for typing) to alleviate his blackberry thumb.

Thanks,

Phil