Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there's no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[cid:image001.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
Knowledge Empowers.

Follow Albany Law ITS:
[cid:image002.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930][cid:image003.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930][cid:image004.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930]

Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

About ten years ago we started putting power at every seat. In the process of installation, conduit and raceway was installed should we decide to spend the money for ethernet at each seat. We ended up going wireless shortly thereafter and have done ok with the wifi service until recently. We're now in the process of upgrading to "n" throughout.

We have found that having the raceway/conduit in place is nice for other things.

I love conduit.

Phil
Concrete Building
Pepperdine Law

From: "Schwartz, Benjamin" <bschw@albanylaw.edu>
Reply-To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 05:32:17 -0800
To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Subject: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there’s no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I’m curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[cid:image001.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
Knowledge Empowers.

Follow Albany Law ITS:
[cid:image002.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930][cid:image003.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930][cid:image004.jpg@01CBC768.D68E0930]

Phil Bohl
Pepperdine Law

RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Agreed, Phil & James, conduit is a big time help. Has been for us as far as mic cables and the such as well.

Gary

Gary Moore, PMP |Assistant Dean for Information Systems| Hofstra Law School
121 Hofstra University, Room 221 |Gary.P.Moore@hofstra.edu |Phone: (516) 463-6067
[cid:image005.gif@01CBC7B2.9C24E1C0]

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Bohl, Phillip C.
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 3:56 PM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

About ten years ago we started putting power at every seat. In the process of installation, conduit and raceway was installed should we decide to spend the money for ethernet at each seat. We ended up going wireless shortly thereafter and have done ok with the wifi service until recently. We're now in the process of upgrading to "n" throughout.

We have found that having the raceway/conduit in place is nice for other things.

I love conduit.

Phil
Concrete Building
Pepperdine Law

From: "Schwartz, Benjamin" <bschw@albanylaw.edu>
Reply-To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 05:32:17 -0800
To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Subject: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there's no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[cid:image006.jpg@01CBC7B2.9C24E1C0]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
Knowledge Empowers.

Follow Albany Law ITS:
[cid:image007.jpg@01CBC7B2.9C24E1C0][cid:image008.jpg@01CBC7B2.9C24E1C0][cid:image009.jpg@01CBC7B2.9C24E1C0]

Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

On 2/8/2011 2:55 PM, Bohl, Phillip C. wrote:
> We have found that having the raceway/conduit in place is nice for
> other things.
>
> I love conduit.

Same here. When we had our renovation/construction project back in
'00-'02, we trenched the floor and ran conduit in one of the old
classrooms to add power and Ethernet to the desktops (we've since
retrofitted all of the classrooms thusly). We ended up not running the
network cables to the desktops, but the conduit for it turned out to be
invaluable--we used the data conduit for the mic cables when we set up
the classrooms for videoconferencing.

You can never have too much conduit...

James

James P. Callison, MCP+I, MCSE
Network Administrator/Webmaster
The University of Oklahoma Law Center ITS
callison@www.law.ou.edu
Bye-bye, baby, bye-bye
You ain't gonna steal my pride
Bye-bye, baby, bye-bye
A good scare's worth more than good advice

Job Opening at WIlliam Mitchell

Please spread the word that we are looking for an Assistant Director for Educational Technology. Mitchell is a fantastic place to work.
If you know of anyone who might be interested, please share this with them and encourage them to apply

_________________________________________________
Lindsay Matts | Educational Technologist, Warren E. Burger Library
651-290-6337 | Fax: 651-290-6318
lindsay.matts@wmitchell.edu
871 Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105
William Mitchell College of Law
For a degree in PRACTICAL WISDOM
_________________________________________________

Posting Date: February 7, 2011

Title: Assistant Director, Educational Technology
Department: Library
Reports To: Associate Dean, Information Resources
Status: Full Time

William Mitchell College of Law seeks an Assistant Director, Educational Technology, to lead a creative, accomplished group of professionals, and to join the Information Resources management team. Information Resources is a valued partner in the College’s curricular innovations, and a leader of numerous strategic projects. The Assistant Director will develop initiatives to encourage beneficial uses of technology throughout the curriculum, coordinate our e-learning initiatives, and evaluate emerging library technologies. The incumbent will create, teach, build, persist, persuade, facilitate, inspire and collaborate with talented individuals both within Information Resources and throughout William Mitchell.

In addition, the Assistant Director, Educational Technology is responsible for: 1) developing digital academic services for faculty, staff, and students; 2) overseeing library systems and technologies; and 3) managing professional staff members.

Qualifications: Master’s degree in either Library / Information Science, Computer Science, Online Learning (educational technology, e-learning or instructional design), or related disciplines; 5+ years educational technology experience particularly with e-learning systems, content and course management systems, proprietary and open source software, and web site and database development; 3+ years management experience; demonstrated creativity in problem solving, and systems analysis and design; strong organizational, multitasking, and project management skills; ability to cope with ambiguity and change and to guide others through change; and excellent planning and communication skills. Experience with Wordpress and library system management (especially Innovative Interfaces), and work experience in legal education is preferred.

To apply please send cover letter and resume by mail to Human Resources, William Mitchell College of Law, 875 Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105; by fax to (651) 290-8645; or by e-mail to hr@wmitchell.edu. Members of under-represented groups are encouraged to apply. AA/EOE.

Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

On 2/8/2011 7:32 AM, Schwartz, Benjamin wrote:
> I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts
> once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do
> students connect to your network?

We require registration before allowing students access to the network,
either wired or wireless. As of last fall, we no longer register the
wired MACs of students' equipment unless requested, and, so far, nobody
has. We didn't remove the wired connections, keeping them as backups,
but they don't get much (if any) use.

James

James P. Callison, MCP+I, MCSE
Network Administrator/Webmaster
The University of Oklahoma Law Center ITS
callison@www.law.ou.edu
I don't really get all the fuss
Why they try to take the guns off of us
'Cause I ain't gonna shoot anyone
And no one shoots at me, 'cause I got a gun

RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

The university used to have a Bradford registration system which required students to register for the wireless network (and we purchased our own Bradford box so that we could help our users register if need be), but the university has moved to a secure AES encrypted network using WPA2 authentication. They are required to login with their portal/network username and password.

Gary

Gary Moore, PMP |Assistant Dean for Information Systems| Hofstra Law School
121 Hofstra University, Room 221 |Gary.P.Moore@hofstra.edu |Phone: (516) 463-6067

-----Original Message-----
From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of James Callison
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 12:11 PM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

On 2/8/2011 7:32 AM, Schwartz, Benjamin wrote:
> I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts
> once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do
> students connect to your network?

We require registration before allowing students access to the network, either wired or wireless. As of last fall, we no longer register the wired MACs of students' equipment unless requested, and, so far, nobody has. We didn't remove the wired connections, keeping them as backups, but they don't get much (if any) use.

James

James P. Callison, MCP+I, MCSE
Network Administrator/Webmaster
The University of Oklahoma Law Center ITS callison@www.law.ou.edu
I don't really get all the fuss
Why they try to take the guns off of us
'Cause I ain't gonna shoot anyone
And no one shoots at me, 'cause I got a gun

RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

At the University of Maryland School of Law, we have both wired and 802.11g access in all of our classrooms. We upgraded our switches 3 years ago and choose to continue the wired access. Central campus controls our wireless, and at that time, there were some issues with wireless access being easy to configure (they were requiring WPA2-TTLS access which isn't built into Windows by default). We still maintain the wired and wireless access at this point. We have not discussed dropping wired access at our next switch replacement.

Our switches are Cisco 6509's with 96 Port line cards with (8) RJ21 connectors (RJ21 is typically used as a 25 pair telco connector) with pigtail cables breaking out to 12 RJ45's for the patch panels, which greatly reduced our cable clutter from separate RJ45 cables for each port.

-Mike

Michael Jewell, CCNA, CCNA-Voice, Cisco Firewall Specialist
University of Maryland School of Law
Information Technology Department
410-706-5771

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Schwartz, Benjamin
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 8:32 AM
To: 'teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu'
Subject: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there's no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[cid:image001.jpg@01CBC787.95E61F70]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
Knowledge Empowers.

Follow Albany Law ITS:
[cid:image002.jpg@01CBC787.95E61F70][cid:image003.jpg@01CBC787.95E61F70][cid:image004.jpg@01CBC787.95E61F70]

RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

At the University of Washington Law School, we moved into a new building back on 2003. At that point we had wireless (802.11 A/B at the time) installed throughout the building--so although wired jacks were available in many of our classroom, we elected to leave those ports disconnected from the switches at the patch bay and limit student computers to the wireless network. Since the wireless access points were on different subnets from our wired ports this also served as an easy means of segregating our classroom computers from the student computers, which were commonly infected with the Blaster worm at that time.

We have had capacity and coverage issues from time to time in certain heavy use areas, but I think all of those were ironed out by deploying additional access points in the high-traffic areas during a recent upgrade to 802.11 N.

Overall, I think avoiding the cost of activating the wired ports was definitely the right decision.

Jon Larson
Multimedia Systems Administrator
University of Washington School of Law
jtlarson@u.washington.edu
206-616-7616

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Schwartz, Benjamin
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 5:32 AM
To: 'teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu'
Subject: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there's no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[720.alaw.logo.black copy]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
Knowledge Empowers.

Follow Albany Law ITS:
[web-sig][blog-sig][twitter-sig]

RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

At Lewis and Clark law school we have a mixture of wired and B/G
wireless. We're in the process of upgrading all our wireless AP's to 'n'
this semester (as well as adding more AP's in high traffic classrooms
and other areas). Wired ports are still occasionally used so we keep
what we have active & will probably keep them in place for the next few
years. About half of the classrooms, (the newer ones), have AC power for
students' laptops.
Cheers,
Bruce

Batch scanning software

Our admissions office is looking for some new batch scanning software for
the large volume of scanning they do and the current software they use (Read
Iris Pro v. 11) involves several steps in separating the documents and
saving them. They are looking for a more streamlined solution to go with the
additional scanner they want to order. Does anyone have recommendations on
software/hardware for batch scanning ?

Thanks

Anne

Anne Houlihan
Divisional Technology Administrator
Western New England College
Department of Information Technology
413-796-2052

RE: Batch scanning software

If your admissions office happens to have access to a Xerox WorkCentre
MFD for scanning, then you may wish to take a peek at ScanFlowStore from
Nuance. I was involved in deploying this solution for our admissions
office and they have been quite happy with it. SFS is a hardware
integrated solution that is specific to the Xerox MFDs though.

Thanks,

Bill

Bill Mette

Dir. Network Services

IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Anne
Houlihan
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 10:44 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: [teknoids] Batch scanning software

Our admissions office is looking for some new batch scanning software
for the large volume of scanning they do and the current software they
use (Read Iris Pro v. 11) involves several steps in separating the
documents and saving them. They are looking for a more streamlined
solution to go with the additional scanner they want to order. Does
anyone have recommendations on software/hardware for batch scanning ?

Thanks

Anne

Anne Houlihan

Divisional Technology Administrator

Western New England College

Department of Information Technology

413-796-2052

RE: Batch scanning software

I'm not exactly sure what you're doing with the final products of the scanning, but if you're making PDF's have you looked at a Fujitsu Snapscan? We have several of them and love them, most of them only make PDF's, but they do it very well, and very fast. They are a little more expensive then a cheap scanner, but they include the license for Adobe Acrobat.

-Mike

Michael Jewell, CCNA, CCNA-Voice, Cisco Firewall Specialist
University of Maryland School of Law
Information Technology Department
410-706-5771

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Anne Houlihan
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 11:44 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: [teknoids] Batch scanning software

Our admissions office is looking for some new batch scanning software for the large volume of scanning they do and the current software they use (Read Iris Pro v. 11) involves several steps in separating the documents and saving them. They are looking for a more streamlined solution to go with the additional scanner they want to order. Does anyone have recommendations on software/hardware for batch scanning ?

Thanks

Anne

Anne Houlihan
Divisional Technology Administrator
Western New England College
Department of Information Technology
413-796-2052

RE: Batch scanning software

Thank you. That is exactly what I was looking for.

From: "Jewell, Michael" <mjewell@law.umaryland.edu>
Reply-To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2011 14:28:10 -0500
To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Subject: [teknoids] RE: Batch scanning software

I¹m not exactly sure what you¹re doing with the final products of the
scanning, but if you¹re making PDF¹s have you looked at a Fujitsu Snapscan?
We have several of them and love them, most of them only make PDF¹s, but
they do it very well, and very fast. They are a little more expensive then
a cheap scanner, but they include the license for Adobe Acrobat.

-Mike

Michael Jewell, CCNA, CCNA-Voice, Cisco Firewall Specialist
University of Maryland School of Law
Information Technology Department
410-706-5771

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu
[mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Anne Houlihan
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 11:44 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: [teknoids] Batch scanning software

Our admissions office is looking for some new batch scanning software for
the large volume of scanning they do and the current software they use (Read
Iris Pro v. 11) involves several steps in separating the documents and
saving them. They are looking for a more streamlined solution to go with the
additional scanner they want to order. Does anyone have recommendations on
software/hardware for batch scanning ?

Thanks

Anne

Anne Houlihan

Divisional Technology Administrator

Western New England College

Department of Information Technology

413-796-2052

_______________________________________________ You are currently subscribed
to teknoids as: ahoulihan@wnec.edu. To unsubscribe send a blank email to
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RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

We just moved into our new single story 8 floor campus in January. We blanketed the building with wireless and therefore do not have places for students to actually plug in. There is a single Ethernet in each classroom at the podium for the professor.

Randy Krzyston, CISSP
Director IT Operations and Security
Thomas Jefferson School of Law

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Jonathan Larson
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 8:05 AM
To: Teknoids
Subject: [teknoids] RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

At the University of Washington Law School, we moved into a new building back on 2003. At that point we had wireless (802.11 A/B at the time) installed throughout the building--so although wired jacks were available in many of our classroom, we elected to leave those ports disconnected from the switches at the patch bay and limit student computers to the wireless network. Since the wireless access points were on different subnets from our wired ports this also served as an easy means of segregating our classroom computers from the student computers, which were commonly infected with the Blaster worm at that time.

We have had capacity and coverage issues from time to time in certain heavy use areas, but I think all of those were ironed out by deploying additional access points in the high-traffic areas during a recent upgrade to 802.11 N.

Overall, I think avoiding the cost of activating the wired ports was definitely the right decision.

Jon Larson
Multimedia Systems Administrator
University of Washington School of Law
jtlarson@u.washington.edu
206-616-7616

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Schwartz, Benjamin
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 5:32 AM
To: 'teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu'
Subject: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there's no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[720.alaw.logo.black copy]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
Knowledge Empowers.

Follow Albany Law ITS:
[web-sig][blog-sig][twitter-sig]

Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

At Emory we removed almost all wired access once we had 802.11g (now 802.11n) access throughout the buildings. We currently have 51 802.11n AP's from Aruba. We have kept power at the seats. We did keep 12 wired ports in a seminar room for emergency exam uploading and to use as a temporary exam "lab" for students with laptop problems. Our 22 seat library lab is still wired.

Ben

--
Ben Chapman
Ben.chapman@emory.edu
Asst Dean, IT Emory University School of Law
404-727-6948 gtalk,skype: benjamin.chapman

From: "Schwartz, Benjamin" <bschw@albanylaw.edu>
Reply-To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 08:32:17 -0500
To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Subject: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there’s no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I’m curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[720.alaw.logo.black copy]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
Knowledge Empowers.

Follow Albany Law ITS:
[web-sig][blog-sig][twitter-sig]

_______________________________________________ You are currently subscribed to teknoids as: ben.chapman@emory.edu. To unsubscribe send a blank email to teknoids-leave@ruckus.law.cornell.edu -- See the web interface at http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/teknoids to get your list password, unsubscribe, and view your list settings.
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This e-mail message (including any attachments) is for the sole use of
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If you have received this message in error, please contact
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Ben Chapman
Assistant Dean, Information Technology
Emory University School of Law

RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Benjamin

Back in Spring of 2000, we renovated our largest classroom, our moot courtroom on the third floor. We were at the beginning stages of a law school wide wireless project using 802.11B but I decided to wire every seat in the classroom. I only bought one 48 port blade for our large Enterasys switch and waited to see how the wireless project panned out. Our wireless project which was completed that summer worked out great, and I never bought any additional blades for that switch on the third floor. Any subsequent classroom upgrades were done without adding ports at every seat, though we have power at every seat in all of our large classrooms. I definitely think you should reduce wired port coverage once you go wireless based on the exact reason you gave below. Hope this helps.

Gary

Gary Moore, PMP |Assistant Dean for Information Systems| Hofstra Law School
121 Hofstra University, Room 221 |Gary.P.Moore@hofstra.edu |Phone: (516) 463-6067
[cid:image005.gif@01CBC76B.C04A3D30]

From: teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces@ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Schwartz, Benjamin
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 8:32 AM
To: 'teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu'
Subject: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?

Good morning,

Here at Albany Law School we currently have a live network jack at each seat in every classroom for students to use. In addition, we have full wireless coverage. Needless to say, all students use the wireless; I have never once seen a student plug into one of the available network jacks, nor do I think they even carry the necessary patch cable. The time has come for us to upgrade our network switches, and we are considering eliminating almost all network jacks in the classrooms because there's no point in paying for ports that are never used.

I'm curious what other schools have done. Did you reduce port counts once you had full wireless coverage? Do you maintain both? How do students connect to your network?

Thanks,
Ben

Benjamin Schwartz
Associate Director, User Services and Network Infrastructure
[cid:image006.jpg@01CBC76B.C04A3D30]
80 New Scotland Ave | Albany, NY 12208
P: 518.445.3350 | E-mail: bschw@albanylaw.edu

Albany Law in New York's Capital.
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Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms

Like James and Phil, I just love raceway/conduit. We have a old building
with asbestos and do not have much choice. Abatement, which we are
forced to do at times is very expensive. The hard wire in classrooms is
for our Podiums and APs. We have a pretty robust wireless system with
some 90 APs. One reason we have lots of conduit.

A few years back, we had to run power to our large classrooms for
laptops. A different conduit but still conduit.

Jim

Jim Epting
Director, Computer Services
USC - School of Law
803-777-5106

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Today's Topics:

1. Re: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms? (James Callison)
2. RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms? (Gary P. Moore)

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Message: 1
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 15:45:37 -0600
From: James Callison <callison@hamilton.law.ou.edu>
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms?
To: Teknoids <teknoids@ruckus.law.cornell.edu>
Message-ID: <4D51B981.4060204@hamilton.law.ou.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed

On 2/8/2011 2:55 PM, Bohl, Phillip C. wrote:
> We have found that having the raceway/conduit in place is nice for
> other things.
>
> I love conduit.

Same here. When we had our renovation/construction project back in
'00-'02, we trenched the floor and ran conduit in one of the old
classrooms to add power and Ethernet to the desktops (we've since
retrofitted all of the classrooms thusly). We ended up not running the
network cables to the desktops, but the conduit for it turned out to be
invaluable--we used the data conduit for the mic cables when we set up
the classrooms for videoconferencing.

You can never have too much conduit...

James

James P. Callison, MCP+I, MCSE
Network Administrator/Webmaster
The University of Oklahoma Law Center ITS
callison@www.law.ou.edu
Bye-bye, baby, bye-bye
You ain't gonna steal my pride
Bye-bye, baby, bye-bye
A good scare's worth more than good advice

RE: Network Jacks or Wireless in classrooms

Thank you all for your replies. It's great to hear that we're on the same page as many others, not only regarding network jacks, but in upgrading to 802.11n and loving conduit as well.

Thanks,
Ben
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